Just a moment, lovely

I have such a low tolerance for media that perpetuates inequalities

like I was reading this comic book yesterday that starred two skinny rich cis-appearing white men

and I was like how hard would it have been for you to make them a different, underrepresented demographic

you could even have put in the absolute minimal effort to just color their skin differently. even just one of them. just try it.

bookshop:

Tumblr fandom is the modern-day sonnet (really)
"My daughter has been acting strange the past few months," wrote a parent on Yahoo Answers recently. “She’s always on this website called Tumbler. … Sometimes she says strange things like “my feels” or “my cries.” … Yesterday she was crying because of shipping. Is shipping some kind of drug term or a cult? I don’t want my daughter involved in negative things like this.”
Don’t worry, was the general consensus of respondents to the worried father. Your daughter’s not in a cult—she’s just in fandom.
Fandom has always evolved its own language to talk about the things it loves. With Tumblr, that language has spawned an enormous culture built around intense emotion expressed in specific ways.
But do “feels,” “all my cries,” and “omg your face I can’t even” all have a larger background context outside of ships, One True Pairings, and reblogs?
One high school English teacher seems to think so.
A few weeks ago, a student in Elise Marks’s AP English class at Piedmont High School in Piedmont, Calif., made a Tumblr post about a comment Marks had made in one of her classes. Marks—Dr. Marks, to her students—had compared the language of Tumblr to the language of classic love poetry.
Marks’s discussion centered around Petrarch, the 14th-century Italian creator of, yes, the Petrarchan sonnet form. Petrarch famously fell in love with a mysterious, married woman known only as “Laura.” For all intents and purposes, Laura was to Petrarch as celebrities and fictional characters are to members of fandom: unavailable, unattainable, perfect, and revered.
"The links to Tumblr are definitely striking," Marks told the Dot in an email: 




The poems are oxymoronic: love is simultaneously an ecstasy and an agony. Laura’s perfect beauty brings him joy, but the fact that he can never have her feels like “a wound,” “a grief,” a “constant death.” 
A couple examples I saw on Tumblr just from yesterday: “What hurts the most? Knowing I will never be anything more than just a crazed fan to them when they’re my world,” and, “He broke my heart … and he doesn’t even know it.” 




Marks sees a direct connection between the conflicting, even assaulting language Petrarch uses in speaking of Laura and the similarly hyperbolic, paradoxical language of Tumblr: 




Whether it’s Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hiddleston, Harry Styles, or Kili the Ridiculously Hot Dwarf, the beloved celebrity is “perfect,” “beautiful,” “addictive,” “overwhelming,” “everything to me.” But because he’s unattainable, he causes deep suffering: “you Life Ruiner!”; “You bastard, why are you doing this to me?!”; “I can’t even deal … I’m so done!”; “Crying!”; “Boom … my ovaries!”; or just simply, “Dead!”




Writer Isabel Cole echoes this sentiment. In a review of One Direction for One Week One Band, she declares, “I am very angry at every member of One Direction, all the time,” and then wends her way through the complicated love/hate relationship of fans to their idols. Referencing Ani DiFranco’s song “Untouchable Face,” she asks:

Has anyone so artfully conveyed what it is to hate someone with every cell in your body for the crime of not loving you the way you could love them, given the chance? Is there a better summation of that brutal internal battle than “fuck you for existing in the first place”? That’s a perfect line.

Marks agrees. The exclamation “Your face!” sums it all up: a celebration of ideal beauty, an accusation of (unintentional) cruelty, a cry of pain.”
Read the rest at the Daily Dot!

bookshop:

Tumblr fandom is the modern-day sonnet (really)

"My daughter has been acting strange the past few months," wrote a parent on Yahoo Answers recently. “She’s always on this website called Tumbler. … Sometimes she says strange things like “my feels” or “my cries.” … Yesterday she was crying because of shipping. Is shipping some kind of drug term or a cult? I don’t want my daughter involved in negative things like this.”

Don’t worry, was the general consensus of respondents to the worried father. Your daughter’s not in a cult—she’s just in fandom.

Fandom has always evolved its own language to talk about the things it loves. With Tumblr, that language has spawned an enormous culture built around intense emotion expressed in specific ways.

But do “feels,” “all my cries,” and “omg your face I can’t even” all have a larger background context outside of ships, One True Pairings, and reblogs?

One high school English teacher seems to think so.

A few weeks ago, a student in Elise Marks’s AP English class at Piedmont High School in Piedmont, Calif., made a Tumblr post about a comment Marks had made in one of her classes. Marks—Dr. Marks, to her students—had compared the language of Tumblr to the language of classic love poetry.

Marks’s discussion centered around Petrarch, the 14th-century Italian creator of, yes, the Petrarchan sonnet form. Petrarch famously fell in love with a mysterious, married woman known only as “Laura.” For all intents and purposes, Laura was to Petrarch as celebrities and fictional characters are to members of fandom: unavailable, unattainable, perfect, and revered.

"The links to Tumblr are definitely striking," Marks told the Dot in an email: 

The poems are oxymoronic: love is simultaneously an ecstasy and an agony. Laura’s perfect beauty brings him joy, but the fact that he can never have her feels like “a wound,” “a grief,” a “constant death.” 

A couple examples I saw on Tumblr just from yesterday: “What hurts the most? Knowing I will never be anything more than just a crazed fan to them when they’re my world,” and, “He broke my heart … and he doesn’t even know it.” 

Marks sees a direct connection between the conflicting, even assaulting language Petrarch uses in speaking of Laura and the similarly hyperbolic, paradoxical language of Tumblr: 

Whether it’s Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hiddleston, Harry Styles, or Kili the Ridiculously Hot Dwarf, the beloved celebrity is “perfect,” “beautiful,” “addictive,” “overwhelming,” “everything to me.” But because he’s unattainable, he causes deep suffering: “you Life Ruiner!”; “You bastard, why are you doing this to me?!”; “I can’t even deal … I’m so done!”; “Crying!”; “Boom … my ovaries!”; or just simply, “Dead!”

Writer Isabel Cole echoes this sentiment. In a review of One Direction for One Week One Band, she declares, “I am very angry at every member of One Direction, all the time,” and then wends her way through the complicated love/hate relationship of fans to their idols. Referencing Ani DiFranco’s song “Untouchable Face,” she asks:

Has anyone so artfully conveyed what it is to hate someone with every cell in your body for the crime of not loving you the way you could love them, given the chance? Is there a better summation of that brutal internal battle than “fuck you for existing in the first place”? That’s a perfect line.

Marks agrees. The exclamation “Your face!” sums it all up: a celebration of ideal beauty, an accusation of (unintentional) cruelty, a cry of pain.”

Read the rest at the Daily Dot!

comixology:

Just so you’re all aware, you know we have the first 3 issues of Lumberjanes on sale, right? 

You better hurry yr buns off though, because our BOOM! Leading Ladies sale ends tonight at 11pm EDT!!

This is seriously a wonderful comic that is only ONE DOLLAR per issue right now

Check it oooout!

"Minaj’s perspective has always been multi-dimensional; she comes forward as an immigrant, as a black women, as a female rapper, as a sexual being, as an artist, as a storyteller, as a survivor, as a bad bitch. She comes forward in order to tell her own story, be it one of domination or declaration. Minaj has even come forward as a feminist. She’s actually done it over and over again. And yet, instead of simply embracing her own discourse on the topic, feminists often can’t wrap their heads around it."
"please love yourselves. really, really loudly and obnoxiously. as loudly as you want. wear shirts that say “I love myself.” wear underwear that says “killin it” on the ass. love yourself at the expense of others if those others are people who have hurt you or belittled you, and never feel guilty about it. god wants you to love yourself and life is too short to deny yourself a crop top and a tub of ben and jerry’s phish food. love yourself so much you convince yourself you can actually fly, and you’ll realize you’ve stopped worrying so much about falling when you jump. [points @ u] kill it child"
punksokka in this post
re: scary cat photoset -- I WAS /ALSO/ THINKING 'TWAS I WHO SET THE HOUSE ABLAZE'
A reply from enjolrant

OMG.  YES.  IM SO PLEASED.

OKAY BUT WHEN I TAGGED THAT I PROMISED MYSELF I WOULD ACTUALLY BAKE AND SEND THOSE COOKIES TO SOMEONE WHO GOT THE REFERENCE SO can I send you some cookies.  what kind do you want.

Really?? That’s incredibly generous!!

I fucking live for chocolate chip cookies — it would be an absolute dream to get some in the mail!

Nicki Minaj’s NECESSARY Shade

acceber74:

yougivemelife:

Nicki did not shade Iggy because she’s “scared” or “worried about Iggy taking her spot.” 

  1. Iggy has a #1 song. That is great. I will not take that accomplishment away from her, or even downplay it. However, Nicki Minaj has 2 #1 albums. 
  2. Iggy sold 300k worldwide in 3-4 weeks. Nicki sold 375k in her first week in AMERICA alone on her first album. Nicki sold 253k in her first week in AMERICA alone on her second. 
  3. This is important because while a #1 one song means you have a popular, catchy SONG, a #1 album and consistent, strong album sales means that you have a memorable body of work. Nicki Minaj has accomplished this twice. 

Thus, Nicki Minaj is not worried about Iggy taking her spot. Nicki Minaj shaded Iggy because Iggy is a modern-day minstrel. For those of you who don’t know what a minstrel is, it is a white performer who mimics PERCEIVED ideals of a minority culture to white audiences in order to make profit. White performers most commonly did this both during and post-slavery. I say that Iggy is a modern-day minstrel because she clearly mimics what she believes black women do in an urban culture and black female performers partake in in the industry in order to portray this mimicry to her white fanbase. If you want, you can google her talking about why she wears wigs (she states that it is because “modern day artists” wear them. In other words, because Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj, Rihanna, etc. wear them), google how she is under the belief that she is the first woman to twerk in the industry (again, taking something perceived to be indicative of an entire black culture and marketing it to white audiences), and google how she believes she is a “hood, white rapper” because she spent 7 years in Atlanta and because she is T.I.’s protegé. She’s taking what she believes black women portray themselves as in the industry, and selling it to her white fanbase. She even blatantly admitted this when asked how she felt about Eve (another fellow female rapper, for those of you who don’t know) saying that she felt that Iggy wasn’t authentic. Iggy responded that she wasn’t pursuing a rap career for Eve or those like Eve (aka, black people), but instead for “the little white girl in the audience - the little white girl who understands [her].” 

That is why Nicki Minaj shaded her. You guys are focusing too heavily on the part of the speech where she says “When Nicki Minaj spits, Nicki Minaj wrote it,” and not enough on “I pray that BET continues to praise authenticity.”Nicki, like Eve and many other black people, realizes that Iggy is mimicking what she perceives as black artistry, and it doesn’t come off as authentic. Her flow is not authentic, and you can tell this by how she delivers her verses/songs vs. how she speaks and interacts in interviews. Nicki Minaj has even said this in songs, such as her lyric in Meek Mill’s I Be On It (“They got everybody infiltrating Negros… I don’t believe ‘em, they lying like Leos). 

I’ve also seen people say that Nicki Minaj is doing to Iggy what Lil Kim did to her, and that it is hypocritical. 

Youtube has four interviews where Nicki Minaj gives Lil Kim praise (prior to the beef, that is.) Even after the release of Pink Friday, in Minaj’s interview with Angela with Hot 97, she states “I love Kim, but at the end of the day I’m not going to sit back and just tolerate [disrespect] I don’t know how many times you want me to shout you out” (which is a reference to the four interviews I’ve mentioned above, plus perhaps countless others that didn’t even make it online). Even on Minaj’s “Sucka Free” mixtape, she gives Lil Kim a shoutout on “Who’s Ya Best MC.” Not to mention, Nicki has done covers of many of Lil Kim (and even Biggie Smalls’) songs. That being said, Lil Kim simply attacked Nicki because she was either hating for profit or simply refusing to look at all the times Nicki did give her acknowledgements.

Iggy, however, did not follow a similar path. During Nicki Minaj’s first BET Award performances, Iggy tweeted that Nicki Minaj lipsynced all of her performances. These tweets were unearthed and can be found on google (search “Iggy and Nicki Minaj twitter beef.”) Then, when Iggy starts getting famous, she raps in the song “Treasure Island” that Nicki paved the way. Again, Iggy’s authenticity comes into question. How can someone who is a lipsyncer pave the way for you in this industry?

I’ve also seen people say that Nicki used the speech to push Iggy to write her own lyrics and spit better bars, as Kim once did to Nicki. This is arguable, but I don’t necessarily believe that was the point of the speech, either. Nicki simply wanted to point out that Iggy should not be taken seriously as a rapper because she’s not authentic. That, in my opinion, is the true shade that Nicki Minaj threw last night. It is no secret that Iggy doesn’t write all her lyrics. This comes as no surprise. The most important part of that speech was her thanks to BET for “praising authenticity," because had BET awarded Iggy with the "Best Female Rapper" award, they would have been condoning modern-day minstrelsy. Them giving Nicki the award proves that they don’t completely stand behind Iggy’s gimmick. 

image

durgapolashi:

"Pop stars traffic in symbology, so when white girls like Miley, Katy, and Lily Allen hide behind the claim that they just didn’t know any better, it seems insufficient. Maybe they didn’t, but somebody around them at some point should have. Which is why it felt tone-deaf when Taylor Swift put out a music video for her new single that featured a couple of scenes in which she used black dancers as props to offset her own clueless whiteness."

(…)

"Into this humid cultural climate strolls Nicki Minaj, whose new video for “Anaconda” isn’t technically a response video to “Shake It Off,” but might as well be. The “Anaconda” video is an extremely self-aware deconstruction of twerking as a trend. Nicki inverts the Miley paradigm, putting her own body front-and-center and surrounding herself with dancers of all races. “Anaconda” turns Nicki’s butt into a literal force of nature, causing earthquakes in a jungle setting. After parodying the idea of exoticism by opening on a jungle scene, she shifts into a workout setup with comically small weights. All of these setups make the same point: Nicki’s body is the modern ideal. And because Nicki is spitting rapid-fire jokes the whole time she is onscreen, it’s impossible to feel like she’s been reduced to a mere body."

Molly’s Nicki piece x Ayesha’s Nicki tweets

y’all should seriously read this piece it is glorious

problackgirl:

can we all conclude that skinny shaming isn’t a thing at all but also like let’s not pretend like nicki’s video was made to uplift fat girls when really all it does is glorify the extremely hard to achieve ‘extremely small waist/big ass’ look that is very in at the moment, none of the girls in the video were fat at all and all fit the ~skinny thicc~ look that is very en vogue atm like let’s be very real

"You don’t owe people the person you used to be. You don’t have to talk to people who are speaking to the old you. If they want to drag old you out, and you’ve already left that person behind, they don’t get to talk to you. When you’ve gone from weakness to strength, you don’t owe a show of your former self to someone who just can’t wrap their head around your change."
Dig Yourself (via offfme)